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American Public Transportation Association

 Schedule

Last updated June 2, 2014

Program Underwritten by:

Thursday, June 12

7:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

8 – 8:30 a.m.

Registration

Continental Breakfast

Breakfast sponsored by:

8:30 – 9 a.m.

Opening Session

Michael P. Melaniphy, president & chief executive officer, APTA, Washington, DC, USA

Nicolas Girard, president and CEO, Agence metropolitaine de transport (AMT), Montreal, QC, CAN

Philippe Schnobb, chairman, Societe de transport de Montreal (STM), Montreal, QC, CAN

Daniel Bergeron, chair, CUTA, and vice president, strategic data and metropolitan affairs, AMT, Montreal, Quebec, CAN

Peter Varga, chair, APTA, and chief executive officer, Interurban Transit Partnership (The Rapid), Grand Rapids, MI, USA

Michael W. Roschlau, president and chief executive officer, CUTA, Toronto, ON, CAN

9 – 10 a.m.

In Search of a Comprehensive Framework – The Toronto Experience

With the establishment of a regional transportation authority, development of a long range plan, extensive exploration of new revenue tools and delivery mechanisms, the Greater Toronto Area has experienced one of the most comprehensive reviews of public transit funding and financing in recent years.Involving the Province of Ontario, regional transportation authority Metrolinx, the City of Toronto, the Toronto and Region Jack CollinsBoard of Trade, and several citizen action groups, the Toronto experience serves as a fascinating introduction to the topic of public transit funding and financing.

Moderator: Jack Collins, executive vice president, Rapid Transit Implementation, Metrolinx, Toronto, CAN

Speakers:

Developing an Investment Strategy – John Howe, former vice president, Investment Strategy and Project Evaluation, Metrolinx, CAN

Public Outreach, Citizen and Corporate Involvement – Carol Wilding, president & CEO, Toronto Region Board of Trade, CAN

Delivery Mechanisms and Alternate Financing & Procurement – Derrick Toigo, senior vice president, Civil Infrastucture, Infrastructure Ontario, Toronto, ON, CAN

10:15 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

Module One: Capturing the Value of Public Transportation

Public transportation contributes greatly to local economies. This capturing the value of transit module seeks to leverage the local economic activity generated by transit, for the use of transit. This module will focus on revenue mechanisms, such as value capture and special business assessment districts that can help transit systems share in the economic benefits they create.

Case study presentation :London CrossRail

CrossRail will change mobility in London and is one of the most significant infrastructure projects completed in recent history in the UK. The business community played a significant part in financing the project, partially predicated on the new business activity that CrossRail will bring.

Moderator: Daniel Bergeron, chair, CUTA, and vice president, strategic data and Julian Waremetropolitan affairs, AMT, Montreal, Quebec, CAN

Speaker: Julian Ware, senior principal, Transport for London, UK

Discussants:

  • Steve Heminger, executive director, Metropolitan Transportation Commission, Oakland, CA, USA

  • Marla L. Lien, general counsel, Regional Transportation District, Denver, CO, USA

  • Antonio Garcia Pastor, head of the studies and planning department, Consorcio Regional de Transportes de Madrid, Madrid, Spain

  • Richard Brandman, advisor, Portland Streetcar, Inc., Portland, OR USA

  • Naoto Kimura, director of International Affairs, Tokyo Metro Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan

12:30 - 2 p.m.

Luncheon keynote on Capturing the Value of Public TransportationGeorge Hazel

Dr. George Hazel, former member of UK Secretary of State for Transport's Steering Group for National Road User Charging and author of Metrolinx Report on Land Value Capture, Edinburgh, Scotland

Sponsored By:

2:15 - 4:15 p.m.

Module Two: How Showcase Cities Have Enhanced Revenue Through Innovative Fare Policies:Worldwide Applications

Much innovation is happening around the world in generating revenue through new fare structures including differential fares, yield management, agreements with universities and school districts, and programs for qualifying low-income riders. There is increasing recognition by riders of the value public transportation offers to them, and the cost-savings it provides them relative to other alternatives.What are the global best-practices in maximizing revenues through the farebox?

Case study presentation: New Strategies for Pricing to Market

The case study will probe into the price-to-market fare strategies being employed throughout Germany.Subtopics will include fare differentiation for target groups (employers, students, seniors), integrated tariffs, new opportunities through e-ticketing, value adding, rebates, and annual adjustments.In short, how can adequate and appropriate funding be generated from the users of the system?

Moderator: Micah Bergdale, CEO, Bytemark, New York, NY, USA

Speaker: Dr. Till Ackermann, manager of economics and business development, Association of German Transport Companies (VDV), Cologne, Germany

Discussants:

  • Julian Ware, senior principal, Transport for London, UK

  • Daniel Bergeron, chair, CUTA, vice president, strategic data and metropolitan affairs, AMT, Montreal, Quebec, CAN

  • Chris Jordan, manager, strategic transportation planning, Calgary Transit, CAN

4:15 - 4:30 p.m.

Coffee Break

Sponsored by:

4:30 - 6:15 p.m.

Module Three: Funding Outside the Farebox: Revenue Tools for Sustainable Infrastructure and Operations

Tax sources from various levels of governments provides the foundational support for public transportation systems around the world.This session will probe revenue ideas which have been successful in providing capital for new projects, as well as tax sources which provide for the ongoing support of public transportation operations. The call for governmental support must be balanced with management strategies which develop secondary revenue sources from property, advertising, etc. Global and North American best-practices will be explored.

Case study presentation:Revenue Strategies Outside the Farebox in Japan

The revenues from non-transportation businesses account for a significant portion of total revenue at many railway companies in Japan.The non-transportation business interests of the East Japan Railway Company (JR East) include in-station retail facilities, adjacent buildings such as department stores and hotels, and other services.Some 17 million people pass through stations every day making them JR East Group's largest management resource.JR East pursues the potential use of space both in and around stations, while creating new, more appealing services so that stations can benefit the development of the surrounding community.Sayama

Moderator: David Narefsky, partner, Mayer Brown, Chicago, IL, USA

Speaker: Emiko Sayama , director, New York Office,East Japan RailwayCompany,Tokyo, Japan

Discussants:

  • Eddie Robar, director, Metro Transit, Halifax, N.S., CAN

  • Jack Collins, executive vice president, Rapid Transit Implementation, Metrolinx, Toronto, ON, CAN

  • Antonio Garcia Pastor, head of the studies and planning department, Consorcio Regional de Transportes de Madrid, Madrid, Spain

  • John Stanley, adjunct professor, Institute of Transport and Logistics Studies, The University of Sydney, Sydney Australia

6:30 - 7:30 p.m.

Cocktail Reception

Sponsored By:

Friday, June 13

8– 8:30 a.m.

Continental Breakfast

Presenting a Public Transportation Financing Toolbox

Featured Speaker: Hilia Boris Iglesia, International Association of Public Transport (UITP), Brussels, Belgium

Sponsored By:

8:30 – 10:15 a.m.

Module Four: Market Forces: Deriving Transit Revenues from Incentives to Manage Consumption

This module will take a detailed look at revenue sources which seek to leverage market forces to better align public resources, while benefiting public transportation in the process. These user and market-based approaches include employer levies, parking fees, road and bridge tolling, and congestion pricing. Properly addressing social equity concerns can unlock the political dilemmas usually associated with these sources.

Case study presentation:Stockholm Congestion Pricing

Stockholm took a look at the success of London’s congestion pricing scheme and created a model of its own, one that takes into account the culture and geography of their own city. This case looks at the power of using other cases as a model to impact one’s own traffic and mobility needs. Congestion pricing can be successfully implemented when it’s built as a homegrown solution.

Moderator: Ruth McMorrow, executive vice president, Parsons Corporation, New York, NY, USAGunnar Soderholm

Speaker: Gunnar Soderholm, director, Environmental and Health Administration, City of Stockholm, Sweden

Discussants:

  • Steve Heminger, executive director, Metropolitan Transportation Commission, Oakland, CA, USA

  • Antonio Garcia Pastor, head of the studies and planning department, Consorcio Regional de Transportes de Madrid, Madrid, Spain

  • Julian Ware, senior principal, Transport for London, UK

10:15– 10:30 a.m.

Coffee Break

10:30 – 12:15 p.m.

Module Five: Voter Approval Experience with Ballot Measures and Referenda

Public appreciation of public transportation in the U.S. is reflected in the approval rate of transit ballot initiatives around the country, which has consistently exceeded 70 percent over the past fifteen years.These self-help local tax initiatives provide leverage to attract additional private, state and federal funding, as well provide the dedicated revenue stream to support multi-year financing.What was the step-by-step formula for success in some of the notable victories? What tactics, strategies and messages have been most effective, and how can those practices be applied globally?

Case study presentation:Los Angeles County Ballot Initiative

Voters in Los Angeles County approved a half-cent sales tax to support the development of regional transportation projects.This action provided the foundation for a major capital initiative. Perspectives of the business community, the grass-roots advocate, and the transit provider will be represented in this case study.

Moderator: Michael I. Schneider, senior vice president and managing director, HDR/InfraConsult, Los Angeles, CA, USA

Speakers:

  • Richard Katz, former member of the board, Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transit Authority, Los Angeles, CA, USA

  • Denny Zane, executive director, Move LA, Los Angeles, CA, USA

  • Tracy Rafter, Los Angeles County Business Federation, Los Angeles, CA, USA

Discussants:

  • Michael A. Allegra, general manager, Utah Transit Authority, Salt Lake City, UT, USA

  • Peter Varga, chief executive officer, Interurban Transit Partnership (The Rapid), Grand Rapids, MI, USA

  • Dave Williams, senior vice president of public policy, Greater Atlanta Chamber, Atlanta, GA, USA

12:30 – 2:15 p.m.

Luncheon keynote on Breaking the Political Gridlock to Fund Transit - TheAnne Golden Toronto Experience

Anne Golden , chair, Ontario Transit Investment Strategy Advisory Panel; Distinguished Visiting Scholar, Ryerson University; and Public Policy Scholar, Woodrow Wilson Center

Sponsored by:

2:15 – 4:15 p.m.

Module Six: Public-Private Partnerships: Alternate Project Delivery to Leverage Investment and Allocate Risk

To address growing infrastructure investment needs, public sector sponsors of transit projects have increasingly explored alternative methods of project delivery and financing, including public-private partnerships (P3s). The majority of U.S. states now have enacted legislation enabling some form of P3 procurement.Differing P3 models in the U.S., Canada, and abroad illustrate valuable approaches for allocating risks and responsibilities between the public and private sectors. We’ll take an in-depth look at key features of selected P3 projects from around the world. What lessons can they impart when considering whether a P3 approach is a stronger option than conventional project delivery?

Case study presentation:TransLink Canada Line

In a well-crafted P3 contract, both the public and private sector partners will appropriately price the risks they assume.For Vancouver’s TransLink Canada Line, built and operated since August 2009 as a DBFOM P3, the private partner has assumed responsibility for operating and maintaining the light rail line for 35 years and shares some ridership risk with the transit property:10 percent of its availability payment is based on achieving ridership forecasts.We will examine how and why the project has performed well under this shared risk/responsibility AP agreement.

Moderator: Angela Iannuzziello, P.Eng., F.E.C., vice president, Canada National Transit Market Sector Lead, AECOM, Toronto, ON, CAN

Speaker: Fred Cummings, president & general manager, British Columbia Rapid Transit Co., Vancouver, BC, CAN

Discussants:

  • Antonio García Pastor, head of the studies and planning department, Consorcio Regional de Transportes de Madrid, Madrid, Spain

  • Jodie Misiak, assistant director for innovative finance, Maryland Department of Transportation, Hanover, MD, USA

  • Marla L. Lien, general counsel, Regional Transportation District, Denver, CO, USA

  • Derrick Toigo, senior vice president, Civil Infrastructure, Infrastructure Ontario, Toronto, ON, CAN

4:15 - 4:30 p.m. Coffee Break

4:30 – 6 p.m.

Closing Session

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